Search

Lync 2013 QoS Configuration Step by Step

Posted 3 years 115 days ago ago by Christian Burke     0 Comments

3 Loved it Love It Hate It

I have put together my personal method for deploying successful QoS to a Lync 2013 network. All the ports and settings are reasonable and real world workloads and are designed for thousands of users. I have personally deployed this configuration to several Lync 2013 Enterprise Voice networks with thousands of users using Lync 2010/2013 desktop applications, Lync 2010 Attendant Consoles, and Lync Phone Edition handsets. Thanks to all of you bloggers that in one way or another contributed to portions of this content.

Lync QoS configuration is essentially performed in three separate steps; 1. Designing Port Ranges and DSCP values, 2. Lync Server Application Config (the easy part), and 3. Group Policy Object (GPO) Config for deployment to the desktops and servers. Keep in mind that there is a HUGELY significant fourth step, which I will not delve into, of configuring every switch, router, and network bandwidth related device to be QoS aware and establish prioritization of these values throughout your network. Any missing link will be sure to seriously degrade the quality of your Lync deployment.

SECTION 1 - PORT RANGES

Before starting you need to decide on the port ranges you are going to deploy as part of the QOS settings. Whatever you decide ensure these ports aren’t being used by other areas within your business.

For this blog, I’m going to use the standard port which are documented by Microsoft. I will also use the recommended DSCP setting again by Microsoft and pretty much any other legitimate QoS designing scheme out there. Keep in mind that there are other workloads and values but since they are bundled into one of these categories in the spreadsheet below, they might not be specifically represented, but they are implied. Please keep in mind that the whole point of QoS is to ensure that the audio part of the Lync conversation is the highest priority. As much as video is important, audio is king. The rest doesn’t matter (as much).

As for DSCP values, the assignments to audio and video are the only two values that matter. All else, like SIP Signaling, App sharing, etc don’t really matter.

Audio EF (DSCP 46) Priority Queue Low loss, low latency, low jitter, assured bandwidth (BW)

Video AF41 (DSCP 34) BW Queue + DSCP WRED Pair with WAN Bandwidth Policies on constrained links

Scenario

Starting port

Ending port

Ports

Client audio

20000

20039

40

Client video

20040

20079

40

Client application sharing

20080

20119

40

Client File Transfer

20120

20159

40

Client Media

20160

20199

40

Server application sharing

40803

49151

8349

Server audio

49152

57500

8349

Server video

57501

65535

8035

SECTION 2 - SERVER CONFIG

Use Lync 2013 Powershell to add the Port ranges.

You need to add these steps to each Lync Server/Pool (FE, Director, PChat)

For the Lync Pool enter the following Powershell command within the Lync Management Shell. Don’t worry about putting these commands in yet. You can wait for the Step by Step below. For now, these are the cmdlets you will be using.

Set-CsApplicationServer -Identity lyncfepool.contoso.com -AppSharingPortStart 40803 -AppSharingPortCount 8349

Set-CsConferenceServer -Identity lyncfepool.contoso.com -AppSharingPortStart 40803 -AppSharingPortCount 8349

NOTE: Change the -identity to the Pool name of your server

Next Power shell commands are for the Lync Client to communicate using QoS

Set-CsConferencingConfiguration -ClientAudioPort 20000 -ClientAudioPortRange 40 -ClientVideoPort 20040 -ClientVideoPortRange 40 -ClientAppSharingPort 20080 -ClientAppSharingPortRange 40 ClientFileTransferPort 20120 -ClientFileTransferPortRange 40 -ClientMediaPort 20160 -ClientMediaPortRange 40

Set-CsConferencingConfiguration -ClientMediaPortRangeEnabled $True

(for the Lync Phone Edition)

Set-CsUCPhoneConfiguration -identity global -VoiceDiffServTag 46

SECTION 3 - GROUP POLICIES

For Lync Servers

Audio & Video entries for the Servers, including Mediation, SBA’s

Audio: DSCP 46 for all applications on source TCP/UDP ports 49152:57500

Video: DSCP 34 for all applications on source TCP/UDP ports 57501:65535

For Edge Servers

Client audio: DSCP 46 for MediaRelaySvc.exe on destination TCP/UDP ports 20000:20039

Client video: DSCP 34 for MediaRelaySvc.exe on destination TCP/UDP ports 20040:20079

Server audio: DSCP 46 for MediaRelaySvc.exe on destination TCP/UDP ports 49152:57500

Server video: DSCP 34 for MediaRelaySvc.exe on destination TCP/UDP ports 57501:65535

Audio & Video Entries for the Windows client.

Audio: DSCP 46 for lync.exe on source TCP/UDP ports 20000:20039

Video: DSCP 34 for lync.exe on source TCP/UDP ports 20040:20079

SECTION 1 – Port Ranges – Step by Step

Of course there are no specific instructions for selecting your port ranges other than to confirm with the Network team, the Security team, etc to make sure everybody is on the same page. If you really want to make those teams’ days, make a spreadsheet out of this and they will be happy.

Component

Server Role

Communication type

Executable name

DSCP value

TCP/UDP

Source IP

Destination IP

Source Ports

A/V Conferencing service

Front End

Audio

AVMCUSvc.exe

46

Both

Any

Any

49152-57500

 

Front End

Video

AVMCUSvc.exe

34

Both

Any

Any

57501-65535

   

App Sharing

ASMCUSvc.exe

 

Both

Any

Any

40803-49151

A/V Edge service

Edge

Audio

MediaRelaySvc.exe

46

Both

Edge Internal IP

Any

49152-57500

 

Edge

Video

MediaRelaySvc.exe

34

Both

Edge Internal IP

Any

57501-65535

A/V Edge service to Exchange UM Servers

Edge

Audio

MediaRelaySvc.exe

46

UDP

Edge Internal IP

Exchange UM Servers

49152-57500

Mediation Server

Front End

Audio

MediationServerSvc.exe

46

Both

Any

Any

49152-57500

Response Group application

Front End

Audio

OcsAppServerHost.exe

46

Both

Any

Any

49152-57500

Conference Announcement service

Front End

Audio

OcsAppServerHost.exe

46

Both

Any

Any

49152-57500

UCMA applications

Front End

Audio

OcsAppServerHost.exe

46

Both

Any

Any

49152-57500

Lync 2010

Client / Endpoint

Audio

Communicator.exe

46

Both

Any

Any

20000-20039

 

Client / Endpoint

Video

Communicator.exe

34

Both

Any

Any

20040-20079

 

Client / Endpoint

App Sharing

Communicator.exe

 

Both

Any

Any

20080-20119

Lync 2013

Client / Endpoint

Audio

lync.exe

46

Both

Any

Any

20000-20039

 

Client / Endpoint

Video

lync.exe

34

Both

Any

Any

20040-20079

 

Client / Endpoint

App Sharing

lync.exe

 

Both

Any

Any

20080-20119

Lync 2010 Attendant

Client / Endpoint

Audio

AttendantConsole.exe

46

Both

Any

Any

20000-20039

Lync Phone Edition

Handset

Audio

n/a

46

Both

Any

Any

20000-20039

SECTION 2 – Server Config – Step by Step

On the Lync 2013 Server that you enter Lync PowerShell commands into, enter the following commands. Be sure to replace your Lync 2013 Front End Pool name into the instructions and also account for your target identity for the Lync Phone Edition config (if any) - they are marked in BLUE below.

Set-CsApplicationServer -Identity lyncfepool.contoso.com -AppSharingPortStart 40803 -AppSharingPortCount 8349

Set-CsConferenceServer -Identity lyncfepool.contoso.com -AppSharingPortStart 40803 -AppSharingPortCount 8349

Set-CsConferencingConfiguration -ClientAudioPort 20000 -ClientAudioPortRange 40 -ClientVideoPort 20040 -ClientVideoPortRange 40 -ClientAppSharingPort 20080 -ClientAppSharingPortRange 40 -ClientFileTransferPort 20120 -ClientFileTransferPortRange 40 -ClientMediaPort 20160 -ClientMediaPortRange 40

Set-CsConferencingConfiguration -ClientMediaPortRangeEnabled $True

The following entry is for any Lync Phone Edition phones you have deployed

Set-CsUCPhoneConfiguration -identity global -VoiceDiffServTag 46

SECTION 3 – Group Policies - Step by Step

  • Open Group Policy Management Tool on Domain Controller

clip_image002

  • Create Two New Policies under the Group Policy Objects section

clip_image004

  • Navigate to the first new policy (Lync Client QoS) and drill down to Computer Configuration > Policies > Windows Settings > Policy-Based QoS

clip_image006

  • Create a policy named Lync 2010 Audio and configure

clip_image008

clip_image010

clip_image012

clip_image014

  • Create a policy named Lync 2010 Video and configure

clip_image016

clip_image018

clip_image020

clip_image022

  • Create a policy named Lync 2010 Attendant Audio and configure. Note that there is no Attendant Video policy as the Attendant Console doesn’t do vide

clip_image024

clip_image026

clip_image027

clip_image029

  • Create a policy named Lync 2013 Audio and configure.

clip_image031

clip_image033

clip_image035

clip_image037

  • Create a policy named Lync 2013 Video and configure.

clip_image039

clip_image041

clip_image043

clip_image045

This is what the Group Policy Management Editor looks like afterwards

clip_image047

Now run through a similar process for the Lync Server QoS Policy

  • Create a policy named AV Conferencing Audio and configure.

clip_image049

clip_image051

clip_image052

clip_image054

  • Create a policy named AV Conferencing Video and configure.

clip_image056

clip_image058

clip_image060

clip_image062

  • Create a policy named Mediation Audio and configure.

clip_image064

clip_image066

clip_image068

clip_image070

  • Create a policy named Response Group Audio and configure.

clip_image072

clip_image074

clip_image076

clip_image078

This is what the Group Policy Management Editor looks like when the Server QoS portion is complete.

clip_image080

  • Select the Group Policy Container that you store your Lync Server Computers and apply the Lync Server QoS Policy you just created.

clip_image082

  • Select the Group Policy Container that you store your Client Computers and apply the Lync Client QoS Policy you just created.

clip_image084

For the Lync 2013 Edge Server(s), since they are not joined to the Domain, you must modify the Local Computer Policy instead, and you must do each one individually.

  • On the first Lync 2013 Edge Server, open the MMC
  • Add the Group Policy Object Manager Snap-In

clip_image086

  • Navigate to Local Computer Policy > Computer Configuration > Windows Settings > Policy-based QoS

clip_image088

  • Create a policy named AV Edge Audio and configure.

clip_image090

clip_image092

clip_image093

clip_image095

  • Create a policy named AV Edge Video and configure.

clip_image097

clip_image099

clip_image068[1]

clip_image101

This is what the Policy-based QoS Local Computer Policy should look like.

clip_image103

  • Repeat the process for each additional Lync 2013 Edge Server.

You have now completed the QoS Configuration for Lync 2013! Again, please make sure your network hardware, routers, switches, firewalls, etc have all been configured to account for DSCP data. With that all completed, your Lync 2013 is ready for perfect quality audio and video.



About the Author

No Comments


Add Comment

Enter the name you would like to appear on the comment.
(required)
Enter the email you would like to use to get updates. You email is not visible and can not be used by other users.
(required)
If you have a website, enter the url here. Ex: www.site.com
Enter you comment help.

CAPTCHA image
Enter the code shown above in the box below
 
  Post Comment
Christian Burke is currently employed by and provides Unified Communications solutions for Microsoft Corporation.  With his primary focus as a Lync Voice Technology Solutions Professional, he is dedicated to designing and building cutting edge Lync infrastructure for clients around the world.  He created this blog to document some of the many processes he has grown familiar with over the past few years.  He knows that blogs, especially for Lync where good documentation is dodgy at best, are a crucial information source for building the perfect Lync system.  So, this blog is his contribution.  Enjoy.
Copyright 2017 by xLync.com